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« What Makes Autodesk a Best Place to Work | Main | ITAMCO Named 2014 Autodesk Inventor of the Year »

03/09/2015

Comments

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Scott Sheppard

I sit next to Carl. I just happened to peek over his shoulder while he was typing this up. I remember chuckling to myself how he was toiling over it so passionately, when blog writing is something I do every day.

ralph grabowski

As I understand it, Fusion 360 runs mostly on the desktop, with just a few functions that run optionally on an Autodesk server, like rendering. OnShape is 100% on the cloud. For this reason, I don't understand how "Onshape is probably most similar to Fusion 360" or how Fusion 360 can be called "our cloud-based CAD/CAM tool" when it is not (mostly).

For details, please see Kevin Schneider's January interview at http://www.worldcadaccess.com/upfrontezine/2015/01/upfrontezine-.html

Paul Munford

Hi Carl,

Great article. Concise and factual - with no name calling ;)

I have to tell you.Although I've been involved with Fusion360 from the beginning, I'm excited about the arrival of OnShape.

Why? Because at heart I am not a Solidworks fan or an Inventor fan - I'm a CAD fan! and proud of it ;)

OnShape means competition for Fusion360. Competition drives innovation, which means better CAD tools for us.

I'm glad you guys have got each other to spur each other on. Just keep it friendly ;)

I'm looking forward to hearing from you both at D3D Live in March.

Bring it on!

Paul Munford

Duncan Anderson

Two comments about 'the Cloud', security and reliability.
As far as I'm concerned and I believe a lot of companies as well, 'the Cloud' starts the moment it leaves a company's intranet via fibre-optics etc.
The data is now outside the control of the company and yet not controlled by the company providing service. As an engineer I always ask the question, "what happens when something goes wrong?" I stress, when not if.
An atypical example, a project needs to be completed, all that is needed is some analysis. As the data is being sent to 'the Cloud' a workman digs through a fibre-optic cable severing the company's digital link with the outside world.
It now gets worse. The company employed to repair the fibre-optic isn't that bothered about security and the person who repairs the fibre-optic installs a device that can read the light pulses and transmits that to A. N. Other.
This is only discovered when it become apparent that Intellectual Property has been stolen. The Court case becomes long and protracted and it all becomes very ugly. In the meantime, the company wanting the analysis has had the reputation badly damaged and loses work.
Okay, this is a worse case scenario, but you can hopefully see people's fears. Intellectual Property is now outside of the control of owning company and there is always the risk of a technical failure in between the company and the place where the analysis happens.
A secure satellite link as a back-up might answer some of these fears, but I would still advise caution.

Milton Capsimalis

As much fun as a good public debate can be these guys are hardly important enough to argue with. OnShape is the Dahntay Jones of software. #HeDontPlay...

Sunith Babu L

When there is no competitor, the strength of a product cannot be quantified for a common man. New products come to the market with a bang, saying it does this, it does that. All I can say is Autodesk has been consistent in the cloud since 2013 as I've been using Fusion 360 and will retain its position in the cloud world. The arrival of new cloud tools will just make users better understand what the offerings are on the cloud.

paul sherwood

When can we expect to concurrently access Revit central models stored on our cloud-based servers?

Kirubakaran Candassamy

As an Autodesk re-seller and a consulting partner, there were days when we used to dread the idea of CAD moving to the cloud. We were worried about our business interests if everything were to move away from the desktop which we sold and earned our bread & butter.
But, Autodesk is not a company that does things for the sake of doing it. As a company focused on satisfying engineering and business needs, it has moved key functionality and features that require collaboration and heavy muscle power to the cloud, while safely keeping localized processes on the desktop.
And just as in the past, continues to offer several customization and development options through APIs to its desktop and cloud offerings, thus opening up huge service and consulting opportunities for partners like us, who add value to client needs.
With cloud opening up, we now have bigger reach and business opportunities in providing cloud content, BIM libraries, cloud based ETO configurations, PLM that talks to ERP and manufacturing on the cloud etc.
Now, we dont fear cloud; rather we see opportunities from a bigger market.

Allan Behrens

We live in an (what to me is an) exciting world of rapidly changing markets, supplier ecosystems and technologies. As Carl (rightly) intimates, our aspirations of technology (both software and hardware) should be so much more than just a better 'mousetrap'. It’s about helping clients achieve (profitable) ambitions and deliver better, more affordable, differentiating products to us, their customers.

Software innovation that allows us to do old things in new ways, does new things, makes the simple trivial (or unneeded), the difficult simple and the impossible, possible...and available to all, is the next generation. I applaud all those who're making this happen, keep up the great work!

Kevin Schneider - Autodesk

Ralph,

I want to follow up on your comment:
"As I understand it, Fusion 360 runs mostly on the desktop, with just a few functions that run optionally on an Autodesk server, like rendering. OnShape is 100% on the cloud. For this reason, I don't understand how "OnShape is probably most similar to Fusion 360" or how Fusion 360 can be called "our cloud-based CAD/CAM tool" when it is not (mostly). - See more at: http://inthefold.autodesk.com/in_the_fold/2015/03/setting-the-record-straight.html#sthash.YedJ77H8.dpuf"

When we talked, I made the point that our focus is on any device and ensuring the best user experience given that device. Your characterization that that "Fusion is not (mostly) Cloud-based." is not accurate. As Carl notes above, cloud and browser are not the same thing. Evernote and Spotify have thin-clients, but no one would call them anything but cloud services. Some people forget too — Fusion 360 offers a thin local client because our customers were asking for a way to work offline. Browser only and mobile clients are on their way using the cloud stack that we have been building for the last 5 years openly with our community. This is about doing what's best for engineers, not what's the "coolest" technology for it's own sake.

Amar Hanspal

Paul,

To your question on "When can we expect to concurrently access Revit central models stored on our cloud-based servers?" please check out Project Skyscraper at: http://www.autodesk.com/products/collaboration-for-revit/overview

Stan Przybylinski

The more appropriate comparison is Onshape as it started and any other CAD product when it was first released. I am not the one to comment on functionality (there are others here significantly more qualified than I), but apples to apples comparisons are most appropriate.

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